Chapter 2 – Page 49 - Wukrii
Chapter 2 – Page 49
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dracone
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dracone

It’s amazing how traditions manage to survive, many of the surviving ancient traditions have changed considerably since the time of their historic roots. For example, and I like to use this one a lot, Halloween gets its name from All Hallows Eve, which was the Christianized version of the Celtic holiday of Samhain, Samhain was the Celtic New Year celebration, it was believed the veils between the lands of the living and the dead were at their weakest at the point where one year ends and another begins.

A lot of the practices we see with Halloween have roots in traditions that are much than most people think. Keeping with the example I started with, for consistency’s sake, the practice of dressing up in costumes on Halloween has its roots in the practices of Samhain involving dressing up as Faeries and Goblins then dancing around to distract them from the festivities of Samhain and the practice of wearing scary masks to frighten away malicious spirits (as well as fey and goblins that weren’t distracted by the dancing about) from the celebration grounds. The practice of the Jack-o-lantern is newer by comparison but very old, it has its roots in the Old Irish tradition of carving giant Beets and Turnips into lanterns.

It even has a story called Jack of the Lantern, which tells the story of the namesake of the Jack-o-lantern, I highly recommend reading up on the story if you haven’t yet; the whole pumpkin carving tradition that is often associated with Halloween is a result of people choosing to use gourds (of which pumpkins and squash are both considered) as substitutes due to the lack of overly large beets and/or turnips in mainland Europe and the US when the practice left its native Ireland and was introduced to those regions. So, if you really want to get authentic with your Halloween celebrations, go buy a sugar beet, the mature ones can get pretty big, and carve into an actual lantern. At the very least, your jack-o-lantern will be less like the rest you see around that time of the year.

Nirozu
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Nirozu

Sooooo
No one is gonna talk about the 4th panel? Anyone? Just me OK

HellRay
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HellRay

Her tail looks really fluffy.